Apple to apply renewable strategy to global supply chain

Technology giant Apple says that it is aiming to clean up its supply chain. The California-based company already powers the majority of its offices, retail stores and data centres using renewable energy sources, but manufacturers and other elements of its

21st September 2016


Apple to apply renewable strategy to global supply chain

Technology giant Apple says that it is aiming to clean up its supply chain. The California-based company already powers the majority of its offices, retail stores and data centres using renewable energy sources, but manufacturers and other elements of its worldwide supply chain are not always as green.

Lisa Jackson, Apple's Vice President of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives, said that the company is looking to work together with its manufacturers and suppliers on a number of projects.

Speaking at the launch of Climate Week NYC, she said: “We are firm believers that everybody has a responsibility to address climate change. We're also bringing key suppliers along on this journey with us."

Jackson, who also served as Head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for four years, went on to say that around 77% of Apple’s overall CO2 emissions originate from the company’s global supply chain.

Third-party suppliers of products and parts such as the iPhone’s glass covers and antennae bands are still reliant on fossil fuels.

Emily Farnworth of The Climate Group, the non-profit company organising the Climate Week event, told Mashable: “So Apple can say, if you're using iTunes, that's from 100 percent renewable electricity, but they can't necessarily say the same for your Macbook Air."

Jackson announced that Apple is looking to introduce more than four gigawatts of renewable energy to its partners’ operations by 2020. She also said that the company responsible for manufacturing the iPhone’s antenna bands, Solvay Specialty Polymers, is committed to switching to 100% renewable energy for all of its Apple-related activities by 2018. This would involve ensuring compliance in 14 manufacturing bases across eight different countries.

Jackson stated: “These acts of leadership by our suppliers are so important, because they demonstrate that the large manufacturers do value where their energy comes from and are increasingly demanding greater amounts of clean energy worldwide."

 

 

 

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